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In this blog, you'll find my journey through my grandmother's recipes. After she died, I took her recipe box home and cooked many of the recipes in it. There are also a few recipes that I enjoy that weren't made by her. If you are looking for my other food blog, visit www.kimmycooks.wordpress.com.

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7 November 11

Meal Planning

I’ve decided to bring back the “Kimmy Cooks” blog. My reason is because I’ve started meal planning, and it is saving a ton of money (as in, $50 grocery bill…total). Not only is it saving money, but I’m learning to cook a ton of new things. Just tonight, I made Chicken Parmesan. I’ll write about that tomorrow, so I can include what we do with leftovers. I’ve made lots of things, and I’ll write about them too. I wish I would have thought to take pictures of those. I hope you enjoy this.

Even though these new recipes may not come from my grandmother’s box, she still gets the credit for giving me the confidence to try new things while cooking when I started this blog the first time around. Enjoy!!

Edit: I’ve moved this blog to www.kimmycooks.wordpress.com because I couldn’t upload pictures to tumblr like I used to. Be sure to follow me there!

2 September 10
Meatball Stew
This is the way I make meatball stew. 
I am rethinking my blog. I intend on giving my grandmother full credit for it. I’ve gotten to a point where I don’t have as much time to shop for ingredients (I’m always tired) and most of the recipes left in the box are things that I do not like (lots of oyster recipes). This is the new direction I’m taking my blog: the way I cook things, the way I learn to cook things, and also my grandmother’s recipes. I’m not much of a cook, which means that when I do cook, I use a lot of short cuts. I cook a lot of common things, just in a different way than other people. I still get a yummy result at the end. I would love to share my personal recipes. So here goes the first post of my new-ish blog.
A twitter friend of mine posted that she was making meatball stew for supper. It made me hungry for it. 
I use ground turkey. I prefer it to ground beef for some reason, and it also creates less grease. Another good thing about ground turkey is that it is cheaper than ground beef. The first thing I do is brown the meat. I don’t even form it into meatballs. My reason? I don’t like chunky food. I always cut up my meatballs anyway. I figured that cooking this way just cuts out an extra step for me later. If you like meatballs, you can still make meatballs and use the same recipe.
There’s one thing I forgot to do today. I forgot to use onions and bell peppers. I blame it on my “prego brain”. That’s what we’ve been calling it. I forget everything. The food still tasted good, but it was a little bland. You can definitely taste a difference.
*Note: Today, Adam Touchet started blogging on tumblr. I enjoyed reading his posts so much, that it made me feel guilty for neglecting my own. He deserves credit for me writing again.
—-
Ground meat, onions, bell peppers, seasoning, roux, rice.
Brown the meat of your choice in the pot and season. Add onions and bell peppers (the amount that you like). Add water, and heat. Gradually add and melt spoonfuls of roux to the pot until the gravy is the consistency that you like. Continue to season to taste. When finished, serve over rice.

Meatball Stew

This is the way I make meatball stew. 

I am rethinking my blog. I intend on giving my grandmother full credit for it. I’ve gotten to a point where I don’t have as much time to shop for ingredients (I’m always tired) and most of the recipes left in the box are things that I do not like (lots of oyster recipes). This is the new direction I’m taking my blog: the way I cook things, the way I learn to cook things, and also my grandmother’s recipes. I’m not much of a cook, which means that when I do cook, I use a lot of short cuts. I cook a lot of common things, just in a different way than other people. I still get a yummy result at the end. I would love to share my personal recipes. So here goes the first post of my new-ish blog.

A twitter friend of mine posted that she was making meatball stew for supper. It made me hungry for it. 

I use ground turkey. I prefer it to ground beef for some reason, and it also creates less grease. Another good thing about ground turkey is that it is cheaper than ground beef. The first thing I do is brown the meat. I don’t even form it into meatballs. My reason? I don’t like chunky food. I always cut up my meatballs anyway. I figured that cooking this way just cuts out an extra step for me later. If you like meatballs, you can still make meatballs and use the same recipe.

There’s one thing I forgot to do today. I forgot to use onions and bell peppers. I blame it on my “prego brain”. That’s what we’ve been calling it. I forget everything. The food still tasted good, but it was a little bland. You can definitely taste a difference.

*Note: Today, Adam Touchet started blogging on tumblr. I enjoyed reading his posts so much, that it made me feel guilty for neglecting my own. He deserves credit for me writing again.

—-

Ground meat, onions, bell peppers, seasoning, roux, rice.

Brown the meat of your choice in the pot and season. Add onions and bell peppers (the amount that you like). Add water, and heat. Gradually add and melt spoonfuls of roux to the pot until the gravy is the consistency that you like. Continue to season to taste. When finished, serve over rice.

11 August 10
Peanut Butter Fudge
Last time I tried to make fudge, it was a complete failure. It was a pile of slimy sludge, and I was very nervous about trying to make it again. This time I was prepared, I bought a candy thermometer. I made sure to cook the mixture until it got to 250 degrees (the guide on the back of the thermometer said that fudge should reach that temperature) before removing it from the heat.
I prepared it, then I spread it into the dish. I tried to melt the chocolate chips into a sauce, as described. I couldn’t. It stayed solid, and I believe that some of it was probably burnt. So I gave up on the chocolate sauce and I just used chocolate syrup from the bottle. Works just as well! I let it cool while we went out to pick up supper.
When we got home, I attempted to cut it. It was too hard. That’s the exact opposite of what happened last time. I tried with a knife, and it was too hard. I used a pizza cutter. It was easier, but I had to use all of my strength to press down. Then I tasted it. Oh. My. God. It was so good. It wasn’t even tough! It was similar to the thickness of a brownie. Still not the way fudge is supposed to be, but it was definitely a step in the correct direction! Maybe the next time I make fudge, it will be “just right”. The flavor was PERFECT, and it just looks like peanut butter brownies with chocolate drizzled across it.
—-
2 tbsp butter, 2/3 cup carnation evaporated milk, 1 2/3 cups sugar, 1/2 tsp salt, 2 cups (4oz) mini marshmallows, 1 1/2 cups peanut butter chips, 1 tsp vanilla, 1 cup chocolate chips (optional).
Combine butter, milk, sugar, and salt in saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Bring to full boil. Cook 4-5 minutes while stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Stir in marshmallows, peanut butter chips, and vanilla. Stir vigorously until marshmallows melt and blend. Pour into buttered pan. Let cool. Melt chocolate chips, then spread over fudge. Chill before serving.

Peanut Butter Fudge

Last time I tried to make fudge, it was a complete failure. It was a pile of slimy sludge, and I was very nervous about trying to make it again. This time I was prepared, I bought a candy thermometer. I made sure to cook the mixture until it got to 250 degrees (the guide on the back of the thermometer said that fudge should reach that temperature) before removing it from the heat.

I prepared it, then I spread it into the dish. I tried to melt the chocolate chips into a sauce, as described. I couldn’t. It stayed solid, and I believe that some of it was probably burnt. So I gave up on the chocolate sauce and I just used chocolate syrup from the bottle. Works just as well! I let it cool while we went out to pick up supper.

When we got home, I attempted to cut it. It was too hard. That’s the exact opposite of what happened last time. I tried with a knife, and it was too hard. I used a pizza cutter. It was easier, but I had to use all of my strength to press down. Then I tasted it. Oh. My. God. It was so good. It wasn’t even tough! It was similar to the thickness of a brownie. Still not the way fudge is supposed to be, but it was definitely a step in the correct direction! Maybe the next time I make fudge, it will be “just right”. The flavor was PERFECT, and it just looks like peanut butter brownies with chocolate drizzled across it.

—-

2 tbsp butter, 2/3 cup carnation evaporated milk, 1 2/3 cups sugar, 1/2 tsp salt, 2 cups (4oz) mini marshmallows, 1 1/2 cups peanut butter chips, 1 tsp vanilla, 1 cup chocolate chips (optional).

Combine butter, milk, sugar, and salt in saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Bring to full boil. Cook 4-5 minutes while stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Stir in marshmallows, peanut butter chips, and vanilla. Stir vigorously until marshmallows melt and blend. Pour into buttered pan. Let cool. Melt chocolate chips, then spread over fudge. Chill before serving.

8 August 10
Steak, Rice, & Gravy
One of my favorite meals of all time is steak with rice and gravy. I grew up on it. We ate it a few times each week. It’s not only my family, either. In many homes of families across the south, this is a popular dinner menu item. All of my friends, my aunts and uncles, and my grandmother.
Before my grandmother died, she was living with my Nannie (my aunt, who was my godmother. In the south, we call our godmothers “Nannie.”). My Nannie and her family needed to travel out of town for a week, so my husband and I volunteered to take care of my grandmother. On one of the nights, I cooked pork steaks with rice and gravy. I remember eating this meal at her house many times, when I was younger. Instead of sitting and resting as I prepared the meal, she stood next to the stove with her walker, telling me everything she didn’t like about my way of cooking her signature dish. Even though I was probably preparing the meal the same way (or very close) that she would have made it, it didn’t matter. We eventually had to make her go and sit down. She was much too weak to be standing for so long. The food was delicious, and she still approved of it.
The recipe that I’m going to share isn’t strictly hers. It’s the way I make it. My personal recipe is a mixture of all of the recipes of many people I know. I’ve taken a little from each one, and that is how I came up with my own. Also, like many recipes from the south, there are no exact measurements to follow. You have to “eyeball it.” Hope you enjoy it!
—-
Cooking oil, steak, onions and bell peppers, seasoning, gravy flour, water, cooked rice.
Coat the bottom of the pot with the cooking oil of your choice. Heat with medium fire. Add steak, and season. Brown one side, then flip. Add some of the onions and bell peppers that you will be using. Finish browning that side, then add the rest of the onions and bell peppers. Cook a little longer. Add more seasoning to the pot. When the steak is browned, remove the steak from the pot. Raise the fire a little. Stir the onions and bell peppers, browning them a bit. Be sure to scrape any browning marks from the bottom of the pot, it will help your gravy. 1Add some water. Stir. Then add gravy flour. Stir, then continue to add water and gravy flour until the gravy is the consistency you like. Lower the fire and put the meat back into the pot. Add a little more seasoning, and put the lid on the pot. Let simmer until meat is tender. Serve over cooked rice. Mashed potatoes is always a great side dish to compliment this meal.

Steak, Rice, & Gravy

One of my favorite meals of all time is steak with rice and gravy. I grew up on it. We ate it a few times each week. It’s not only my family, either. In many homes of families across the south, this is a popular dinner menu item. All of my friends, my aunts and uncles, and my grandmother.

Before my grandmother died, she was living with my Nannie (my aunt, who was my godmother. In the south, we call our godmothers “Nannie.”). My Nannie and her family needed to travel out of town for a week, so my husband and I volunteered to take care of my grandmother. On one of the nights, I cooked pork steaks with rice and gravy. I remember eating this meal at her house many times, when I was younger. Instead of sitting and resting as I prepared the meal, she stood next to the stove with her walker, telling me everything she didn’t like about my way of cooking her signature dish. Even though I was probably preparing the meal the same way (or very close) that she would have made it, it didn’t matter. We eventually had to make her go and sit down. She was much too weak to be standing for so long. The food was delicious, and she still approved of it.

The recipe that I’m going to share isn’t strictly hers. It’s the way I make it. My personal recipe is a mixture of all of the recipes of many people I know. I’ve taken a little from each one, and that is how I came up with my own. Also, like many recipes from the south, there are no exact measurements to follow. You have to “eyeball it.” Hope you enjoy it!

—-

Cooking oil, steak, onions and bell peppers, seasoning, gravy flour, water, cooked rice.

Coat the bottom of the pot with the cooking oil of your choice. Heat with medium fire. Add steak, and season. Brown one side, then flip. Add some of the onions and bell peppers that you will be using. Finish browning that side, then add the rest of the onions and bell peppers. Cook a little longer. Add more seasoning to the pot. When the steak is browned, remove the steak from the pot. Raise the fire a little. Stir the onions and bell peppers, browning them a bit. Be sure to scrape any browning marks from the bottom of the pot, it will help your gravy. 1Add some water. Stir. Then add gravy flour. Stir, then continue to add water and gravy flour until the gravy is the consistency you like. Lower the fire and put the meat back into the pot. Add a little more seasoning, and put the lid on the pot. Let simmer until meat is tender. Serve over cooked rice. Mashed potatoes is always a great side dish to compliment this meal.

26 July 10

8 Minute Light’n Fruity Pie

I figured that if I’m going to make a pie, I should start with the easiest one I could find. I don’t think my measurements were exact, because I couldn’t find a tub of whipped cream and used canned whipped cream instead. I could only find it in 7oz cans so I used a whole can, and a little more from the next can to make the 8oz that the recipe called for. Also, I didn’t measure the strawberries at all. I just cut a bunch of them into pieces and tossed it into the pot. Either way, it still tasted delicious. You are supposed to leave it in the fridge for 3 hours, but I didn’t want to wait too long so I put it in the freezer for an hour and then in the fridge for another hour. That’s why it looks a little droopy in the picture. When I first cut the piece of pie, it was firm as pie should be. By the time I had my camera ready, it was already drooping. My advice to you would be to leave it in the fridge for the whole three hours, or longer. That way it gets as firm as it is supposed to.

What I like about this recipe is that you can make any flavor you want. I used strawberry jello with strawberries, but you can mix any type of jello flavor with any type of fruit to make a delicious outcome. I may experiment with this particular pie idea for future parties. There are many, many flavors of jello out there!

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1 package (3oz) Jell-o gelatin (any flavor), 2/3 cup boiling water, 2 cups of ice cubes, 3 1/2 cups or 8oz container of cool whip whipped topping, fruit (optional), 8 or 9 inch graham cracker crust.

Completely dissolve gelatin in boiling water, stirring about three minutes. Add ice cubes and stir constantly until gelatin is thickened, about 2 or 3 minutes. Remove any unmelted ice. Using a wire whip, blend in whipped topping, then whip until smooth. Fold in fruit. Chill, if necessary until mixture will mound. Spoon into pie crust. Chill for 3 hours.

24 July 10

Mexican Casserole

I’m not a big fan of Mexican food. In fact, I cringe when our friends invite us to go to Mexican restaurants. I go anyway, and I usually chug margaritas while eating only a small appetizer. I only like fake Mexican food, like Taco Bell. I love Taco Bell. This meal tasted like something that you would order at a Mexican restaurant. I thought it was ok, but I do think that most people would really enjoy it. It’s just a matter of personal taste.

The recipe calls for 2 cups of cooked macaroni noodles. I bought a box that was 16 oz. Two cups, right? I just dumped the entire box into my boiling water and cooked it. It’s definitely more than 2 cups after it is cooked. I ended up only using a fraction of it. I guess I’ll be putting the leftover noodles in the fridge and cooking spaghetti or something soon. I did add one thing: jalepeneo juice. I felt that if it was a “Mexican” dish, it should at least have something Mexican-ish in it.

"There are a lot of different flavors dancing around in my mouth, and I’m not sure how I feel about it yet." That’s how my husband described it. He eventually (after analyzing the food thoroughly) decided that he liked it. I haven’t been cooking lately because my husband was on a two-week business trip, where he only came home for the weekend. I thought it was pointless for me to cook for one, but now I’m back!

—-

2 cups cooked elbow macaroni, 1 lb “hot” bulk sausage, 1 chopped bell pepper, 1 chopped onion, 1/2 cup milk, 1 pt sour cream, 1 can of tomatoes drained and chopped, 1 tsp chili powder, 4 oz grated cheddar cheese.

Crumble and brown sausage in large skillet. Drain well. Add onion and bell pepper, cook until soft. Remove from heat and add macaroni, tomatoes, milk, sour cream, and chili powder. Mix well. Pour into large casserole dish and top with cheese. Cook at 350 until heated through and cheese is melted and bubbly.

18 July 10
Cinnamon Rolls
My husband has been on a business trip all week. When he goes on business trips, he brings me presents. This time, one of my presents was a bottle of cinnamon roll scented bubble bath. It reminded me that there was a recipe for cinnamon rolls in my grandmother’s box.
Sometimes, these handwritten-recipes confuse me. Sometimes certain letters are easy to misinterpret. That was the case for this recipe, too. The words “add milk” looked more like “and bulk”. When I mixed together the flour and shortening, it wasn’t starting to “bulk” or leave the sides of the bowl like the recipe said it should. So I started up a whole new bowl, in case I had gotten the measurements wrong. Then I read the recipe several more times and realized that it said “ADD MILK”. After I added the milk, and it worked as it was supposed to.
You will need a rolling pin. I didn’t have one, so I had to improvise. My husband’s dad used to own an ice cream shop, and they served snocones. We had an empty “snocone juice” bottle, so I used it because it was large and and shaped similarly to a rolling pin. It worked, but I don’t think I put enough flour on the bottle because the dough kept sticking to it. I got the dough flat, but not as even and flat as it should have been. 
Finished everything up, and it was smelling so awesome. Pulled it out of the oven and put the topping on them. We started to eat, only to find that they weren’t cooked all of the way. I put them back into the oven and cooked them longer. Then they were ready.
I probably won’t cook this again because it made a huge mess in my kitchen. It did taste good, but not as good as the pre-made ones you get from the grocery store. If I want cinnamon rolls, I don’t want to spend more than an hour preparing them, only to find that they are “just good” instead of awesomely delicious.
—-
3 cups of self rising flour, 4 1/2 tbsp shortening, 1 cup of milk, 1/2 cup of butter (1 stick), 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 cup of firmly packed brown sugar, 1 tbsp cinnamon, 3/4 cup of chopped pecans or raisins (optional).
Cut shortening into flour until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add Milk & blend with fork until dough leaves the sides of the bowl. Turn onto lightly floured surface & knead 4-6 strokes. Roll into 14x20 inch rectangle. spread butter over dough, leaving a narrow margin on all sides. Combine sugar, brown sugar, and cinnamon. Sprinkle over butter. Add nuts and raisins if desired. Beginning at long side of dough, roll up in a jellyroll fashion. Pinch ends and edges to seal. Cut roll into one inch slices. Place slices cut side down in greased pan. Bake at 375 degrees for 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and cool.
To glaze: Combine 1 1/2 cup confectioners sugar and 3 tbsp of milk. Drizzle over cooled rolls.

Cinnamon Rolls

My husband has been on a business trip all week. When he goes on business trips, he brings me presents. This time, one of my presents was a bottle of cinnamon roll scented bubble bath. It reminded me that there was a recipe for cinnamon rolls in my grandmother’s box.

Sometimes, these handwritten-recipes confuse me. Sometimes certain letters are easy to misinterpret. That was the case for this recipe, too. The words “add milk” looked more like “and bulk”. When I mixed together the flour and shortening, it wasn’t starting to “bulk” or leave the sides of the bowl like the recipe said it should. So I started up a whole new bowl, in case I had gotten the measurements wrong. Then I read the recipe several more times and realized that it said “ADD MILK”. After I added the milk, and it worked as it was supposed to.

You will need a rolling pin. I didn’t have one, so I had to improvise. My husband’s dad used to own an ice cream shop, and they served snocones. We had an empty “snocone juice” bottle, so I used it because it was large and and shaped similarly to a rolling pin. It worked, but I don’t think I put enough flour on the bottle because the dough kept sticking to it. I got the dough flat, but not as even and flat as it should have been. 

Finished everything up, and it was smelling so awesome. Pulled it out of the oven and put the topping on them. We started to eat, only to find that they weren’t cooked all of the way. I put them back into the oven and cooked them longer. Then they were ready.

I probably won’t cook this again because it made a huge mess in my kitchen. It did taste good, but not as good as the pre-made ones you get from the grocery store. If I want cinnamon rolls, I don’t want to spend more than an hour preparing them, only to find that they are “just good” instead of awesomely delicious.

—-

3 cups of self rising flour, 4 1/2 tbsp shortening, 1 cup of milk, 1/2 cup of butter (1 stick), 1/2 cup sugar, 1/2 cup of firmly packed brown sugar, 1 tbsp cinnamon, 3/4 cup of chopped pecans or raisins (optional).

Cut shortening into flour until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add Milk & blend with fork until dough leaves the sides of the bowl. Turn onto lightly floured surface & knead 4-6 strokes. Roll into 14x20 inch rectangle. spread butter over dough, leaving a narrow margin on all sides. Combine sugar, brown sugar, and cinnamon. Sprinkle over butter. Add nuts and raisins if desired. Beginning at long side of dough, roll up in a jellyroll fashion. Pinch ends and edges to seal. Cut roll into one inch slices. Place slices cut side down in greased pan. Bake at 375 degrees for 20-25 minutes. Remove from oven and cool.

To glaze: Combine 1 1/2 cup confectioners sugar and 3 tbsp of milk. Drizzle over cooled rolls.

12 July 10

Strawberry Fig Preserves

When my husband’s grandmother died, we bought the house she lived in. In the backyard is a enormous fig tree (I’ve posted a picture of it, with my dog standing near it so that you can have an idea of how large it is). A couple of summers ago, my mother-in-law and I made fig preserves, so I decided to make some again. This recipe is not from my grandmother’s box, but I felt as if not sharing this would be worse than breaking the little rule of only posting my grandmother’s recipes. It’s a sin to not share how easy it is to make something so delicious. The recipe I’m using is one I found is a mix between what I remember from cooking them with my husband’s mom, and articles I found online to jog my memory. Also, you can use any flavor you like. When we made this last time, we had cherry, watermelon, lime, strawberry, and other flavors. We even mixed a few together. It’s ok to get creative. For this one, I just used strawberry.

For the record, it was delicous, and my neighbors were all very excited to recieve a jar.

—-

6 cups of fresh figs, 6 cups of sugar, 1 large box of jello, 6 pint canning jars, lids, and seals.

Jar Prep: Wash jars and lids very well with soap and water. The sterilizing feature works well on your dishwasher, as well. After this, many people boil the jars and lids in very large pots of water to heat them up and prep them. I looked for an alternate way online, since I don’t have very many large pots. This is what I did: Preheat your oven at 250 degrees, then place the jars and lids on a large cookie sheet. Warm them for about 20 minutes while your figs are cooking.

Wash figs well, and drain water. Remove any stems that may be left from picking the figs. Cut figs into pieces, and add them to the pot. Add sugar to pot. Cook figs and sugar on medium heat for about 25 minutes. Stir continuously. Mash the figs as you stir, to speed up the process. Heat the figs to boiling and continue to stir. Add one large package of strawberry jello, and mix well. Remove from heat. Pour the fig preserves into the pre-heated jars. Seal, and turn upside down until cool. Place in refrigerator to store.

11 July 10
Beignets
I was very excited to see that my grandmother had a recipe for these! In case you are reading this and you aren’t from around here, beignets are a type of breakfast food. New Orleans has a famous restaurant called Cafe du Monde that serves them. You can’t go to New Orleans without having beignets and coffee-milk (cafe au lait) for breakfast.
It was very easy to make, and it tasted like “the real deal.” I cooked it a little bit too long, but that’s ok. It was my first time making them and I was unsure of how long to leave them in. Now I know. Also, the recipe gives you an option to use either a mixture of sugar and cinnamon, or to use powdered sugar. I used powdered sugar because that is what is commonly used. I’ve never even heard of people using the mixture of sugar and cinnamon. I recommend using the powdered sugar, if you make it. Also, wear light colored clothing. Powdered sugar will get on your clothes.
My dog enjoyed these, as well. I left the plate on the table (there were only a few left), and came to sit on my couch to type this blog entry. A few minutes later, my dog came into the living room from the kitchen. She rested her head on my dark colored couch, and white powder smeared across the cushion. Guilty. Now we are watching her closely, hoping she doesn’t slip into a diabetic coma or something.
—-
1 cup of flour, 1/4 tsp salt, 1 tsp baking powder, 2/3 cup milk (enough to make a soft dough).
Blend the above ingredients together and drop by teaspoon into hot fat. Turn when brown. Drain on a paper towel. Drop into a paper bag which contains 1 cup pre-blended sugar and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Shake and serve warm. You may also use powdered sugar instead of the sugar/cinnamon mixture. Can be stored in a plastic container. Also, beignets freeze well and can be warmed in the microwave.

Beignets

I was very excited to see that my grandmother had a recipe for these! In case you are reading this and you aren’t from around here, beignets are a type of breakfast food. New Orleans has a famous restaurant called Cafe du Monde that serves them. You can’t go to New Orleans without having beignets and coffee-milk (cafe au lait) for breakfast.

It was very easy to make, and it tasted like “the real deal.” I cooked it a little bit too long, but that’s ok. It was my first time making them and I was unsure of how long to leave them in. Now I know. Also, the recipe gives you an option to use either a mixture of sugar and cinnamon, or to use powdered sugar. I used powdered sugar because that is what is commonly used. I’ve never even heard of people using the mixture of sugar and cinnamon. I recommend using the powdered sugar, if you make it. Also, wear light colored clothing. Powdered sugar will get on your clothes.

My dog enjoyed these, as well. I left the plate on the table (there were only a few left), and came to sit on my couch to type this blog entry. A few minutes later, my dog came into the living room from the kitchen. She rested her head on my dark colored couch, and white powder smeared across the cushion. Guilty. Now we are watching her closely, hoping she doesn’t slip into a diabetic coma or something.

—-

1 cup of flour, 1/4 tsp salt, 1 tsp baking powder, 2/3 cup milk (enough to make a soft dough).

Blend the above ingredients together and drop by teaspoon into hot fat. Turn when brown. Drain on a paper towel. Drop into a paper bag which contains 1 cup pre-blended sugar and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Shake and serve warm. You may also use powdered sugar instead of the sugar/cinnamon mixture. Can be stored in a plastic container. Also, beignets freeze well and can be warmed in the microwave.

7 July 10
Marinated Carrots
Tonight, we cooked something else for dinner, but we made the marinated carrots as the side dish.
I would like to send a HUGE public thank you out to my husband, Mikey. He’s more help that I can even describe. Today was a rough day for me, the pregnancy fatigue hit me very hard. I could hardly move because I was so exhausted. He made supper for me, and all I had to do was cook the side dish.
It was very simple. There isn’t really a way to screw this up. All you have to do is add the ingredients together. I used baby carrots so that I wouldn’t have to cut anything (and because we already had some in our fridge). I also split the recipe in half, so that we wouldn’t have too many leftovers. I used 2.5 cups instead of 5 cups, etc. The only ingredient I used that may have been different was the for part where it says to add dry mustard. I’m not sure what dry mustard is, and I was too tired too do research. So I just added a little bit of mustard. I figured it wouldn’t make very much of a difference, since it was such a small amount.
Well, I did not like the flavor at all. My husband loved it. I guess it’s a matter of taste. I ate a few carrots and couldn’t eat anymore of it.
—-
5 cups of sliced fresh carrots, 1 large sliced onion, 1 sliced bell pepper, 1/2 cup of oil, 1/2 cup of vinegar, salt to taste, 1 can condensed tomato soup, 3/4 cup sugar, 1 tsp pepper, 1 tsp dry mustard, 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce.
Boil carrots until tender. Drain. Mix dry ingredients together. Add tomato soup, oil, vinegar, Worcestershire. Pour mixture over carrots, onions, and bell peppers. May be eaten at once, or marinated overnight.
Serves 8-10

Marinated Carrots

Tonight, we cooked something else for dinner, but we made the marinated carrots as the side dish.

I would like to send a HUGE public thank you out to my husband, Mikey. He’s more help that I can even describe. Today was a rough day for me, the pregnancy fatigue hit me very hard. I could hardly move because I was so exhausted. He made supper for me, and all I had to do was cook the side dish.

It was very simple. There isn’t really a way to screw this up. All you have to do is add the ingredients together. I used baby carrots so that I wouldn’t have to cut anything (and because we already had some in our fridge). I also split the recipe in half, so that we wouldn’t have too many leftovers. I used 2.5 cups instead of 5 cups, etc. The only ingredient I used that may have been different was the for part where it says to add dry mustard. I’m not sure what dry mustard is, and I was too tired too do research. So I just added a little bit of mustard. I figured it wouldn’t make very much of a difference, since it was such a small amount.

Well, I did not like the flavor at all. My husband loved it. I guess it’s a matter of taste. I ate a few carrots and couldn’t eat anymore of it.

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5 cups of sliced fresh carrots, 1 large sliced onion, 1 sliced bell pepper, 1/2 cup of oil, 1/2 cup of vinegar, salt to taste, 1 can condensed tomato soup, 3/4 cup sugar, 1 tsp pepper, 1 tsp dry mustard, 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce.

Boil carrots until tender. Drain. Mix dry ingredients together. Add tomato soup, oil, vinegar, Worcestershire. Pour mixture over carrots, onions, and bell peppers. May be eaten at once, or marinated overnight.

Serves 8-10

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh